Why We Love Women In Tech

What happens is very subtle. "You are not as important in this conversation.” “You are not as promotable.” “You are not technically as capable.” “Let me explain this to you." It's death by 1,000 papercuts , and all those little slices add up. You hit a wall at some point. If this sounds relatable, then you might be a woman in tech. Did you know that women are twice as likely than men to leave the tech industry? This isn’t a statistic we can or should be proud of. We want to address it. Developer Advocate Extraordinaire Emily Freeman (...

Spanish, English, and Code? An International Student’s Experience at Code School

I'm Jorge and I'm from Mexico City, but I found out about Turing here in the United States. My main thing is art -- I’m an artist -- and I do a lot of painting and drawing. As an artist I started getting involved in a lot of graphic design. I am really good at Photoshop and Illustrator so I started incorporating that into jobs and whatnot. Then I wanted to take it deeper. One of my old art mentors, Jeneve, went to Turing, which is how I found out about Turing. Jeneve went to the school before it had both front-end and back-end programs. It was all one program. My art mentor told...

This Couple's Best Decision? Code School.

My name is Rhonda and I am a former television producer, host producer, video editor, and copywriter. I was doing cable broadcasting but was always interested in internet broadcasting, coding, robotics, and cryptocurrency. I actually started in computer science and transitioned out of that and into my career route, but I was always interested in the tech side of the work that I did and wanted to branch out. That was a huge motivator for me to really explore coding and what I could do with it. I found Turing through a co-worker of mine who actually left the company we were working for to go to...

Guest Post: How Your Bootcamp Review Can Help Future Students

This post was written by Mary Bergeron, Director of Marketing at SwitchUp. Before you committed to a bootcamp, chances are you researched different options online. Maybe you read through reviews on a site like SwitchUp, browsed posts on Medium, or even reached out to alumni through social media. Reviews and feedback are extremely important for future students, thanks to an ever-growing number of options for tech education. According to SwitchUp’s research, there are now over 120 in-person bootcamps and hundreds of part-time and online programs available worldwide. With more choice than...

Two Instructors Who Change Lives Through Coding

I just moved to Denver from Boston... I was previously in engineering positions and I’m now an instructor on the Front-End Team and also the Technical Lead. Before Turing, I was working at the New York Times and also at Mozilla doing engineering work. I previously worked in media very frequently. I was a journalism major so I really liked working in industries that were a little bit outside of tech. One thing that’s great about being an engineer is that every industry needs them. The most recent project that I worked on at my last position at Mozilla was really exciting…...

Feeling like a fraud? Get thee to Turing Imposters Lunch!

“Do I belong here?” “Am I smart enough to be here?” “Did I make a huge mistake in coming here?” “Do I have what it takes?” “How can everyone else get it but not me? Is there some secret formula or special quality that I lack?” “How is everyone else so much faster than me?” If you’ve asked yourself any of these questions, you might be experiencing imposter syndrome. Luckily, here at Turing, we have a community of people who know what it’s like and have stood in your shoes. In this post, I’ll share some...

Coffee on Command

Somewhere near the beginning of my journey into programming, a visiting instructor mentioned — offhand — that her company had a system that would start brewing coffee with a Slack command. As a person who is 90–95% fueled entirely by coffee, and a Turing student with absolutely zero time to make it: this was all I needed to hear. I decided to make a Coffee Bot for the Turing Slack team. It would be a system that users could (at first) use to let people know that that coffee was brewing, and then eventually use to actually start the brewing process remotely. This post will go...

Alternatives to Using the Try Method

At my work we have a North America team and a China team. Part of our workflow is to review each others merge requests before merging. As a junior developer I often see things that I have never seen before and must make an educated decision about whether the unfamiliar pattern is a genuine coding error or deviation from best practices, or just something new I don't know about. And because the person who wrote the code is in China in an opposite time zone, it's not easy to ask them directly about it. So, while reviewing an MR I saw a use of the try method that I had never seen before...

The Future is Bright for Veterans in Tech

There’s an increasing need for technical talent in computer programming, and a definite gap in need versus talented candidates. Just in Colorado alone, it has been reported that there are about 16,000 open computing positions. Glassdoor reports the average salary for programmers in the United States is $65K. According to a 2015 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, more than 495,000 United States veterans are considered unemployed. These individuals could be taking advantage of these open positions that yield a substantial salary. We see a tremendous opportunity for veterans to use their...

What is the Law of Demeter and Why Should I Follow It?

A few times I've been told during code review that something violates the Law of Demeter. This method for example. class User def user_info "#{user.name}, #{user.department.name}" end end Which led me to ask: what is the Law of Demeter, why should I follow it, how do I know if I'm violating it, and how do I avoid violating it? The Law of Demeter is formally defined as, A method of an object may only call methods of: The object itself. An argument of the method. Any object created within the method. Any direct properties/fields of the object. The above code sample violates the law with...
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